Author Archives: Mary K

Literacy Fast Fact – Mirrors and Windows

Recently all of the Joint Chiefs had the opportunity to present on various topics at the Nevada Library Association Conference. We also had the distinct pleasure of attending a presentation on diverse library collections presented by Angie Manfredi. In her presentation, she talked about the origin of the idea that children need to both read about worlds different from their own (“windows”) and read about experiences like theirs and children like them (“mirrors”). I admit I didn’t know that the idea was first explored by  Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop in her paper “Mirrors, Windows, and Sliding Glass Doors” and was originally published in 1990. Thank you, Angie, for giving credit where credit is most certainly due!

 

 

 

Literacy Fast Fact: Early Relationships Matter

Studies show that the relationships we have when we’re young with the adult caregivers in our lives make a difference in how we learn. Having loving caregivers who meet a child’s needs and provide stability and support goes a long way towards buffering toxic stress that can have a long-term impact on learning and growth.

 

Children who feel loved, safe and happy are better learners.

 

Learn more about the importance of early relationships in this article from Zero to Three.

 

 

Advocacy Toolbox: Early Intervention and other Developmental Milestones Resources

HI all! This much delayed edition of Advocacy Toolbox is brought to you by a question I hadAdvocacy Toolbox with watermark (1) from a mom in a parent presentation recently. She was asking about speech delays – her daughter had one, she felt, and she was having trouble getting her child’s preschool to work with her to get her daughter evaluated. I referred her to the local free Early Intervention organization and she was happy to have another resource to try.

 

As youth librarians and early literacy advocates, we are experts in early literacy skills development and subsequently know quite a bit about how a young child’s brain develops. For some of our parents, however, that can translate into us being experts about all-things parenting related. I attended a focus group once, in which we were asking parents to use a new early literacy resource website, where we noticed something: parents don’t separate their parenting questions into separate “baskets.” It’s all one big basket, and into it goes every concern they have about their child: questions related to nutrition, discipline, learning, and more. So, naturally, when we answer questions about language and reading development it’s a natural progression for a parent to then ask a question about how their child is developing in other ways.

 

It’s easy to want to try and answer their questions but we know we can’t be all things to all patrons. So here’s where we do what librarians do best: connect them with resources that CAN answer their questions. Here are some I’ve compiled that might be useful for you:

 

Early Intervention: Most states offer this free service to parents of young children. The child can be evaluated for developmental delays, and if needed, get connected to services. Here’s a list of EI services by state.

 

Developmental Milestones: Often parents just need to be reassured that their child is developing on track. Here are some resources:

  • Learn the Signs: Act Early is the Center for Disease Control’s early milestones page. Includes milestones by age in months and printable and printed (free!) materials.
  • Zero to Three is an amazing resource with tons of information for parents on things like infant and child mental health, discipline, school readiness, and more.
  • You will have to wade past a few ads, but BabyCenter offers great information – categorized by baby, toddler or preschooler – about developmental milestones and more.
  • Your local children’s hospital – if you have one – may be a great resource for information about child development. Mine, the Children’s Hospital of Colorado, offers Babies 101 and Toddlers 101 to answer some basic questions.
  • PBS Parents offers sections on child development  up to age 8!
  • From the American Academy of Pediatrics comes HealthyChildren.org, which offers great “ages and stages” information.

 

 

Guerrilla Storytime at PLA 2016

 

Thank you to everyone who joined us for Guerrilla Storytime at PLA and thank you to CLEL for partnering! We had a great turnout and got some amazing ideas! Because the summaries are so long (and have SO MUCH GREAT STUFF), I’m attaching them here as google docs. Andrea and I did our best to capture everything; I apologize if we missed something! Please comment if you have trouble accessing.

 

Summary for Thursday, April 7

 

Summary for Friday, April 8

 

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